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  • JUSFC's mission is to support reciprocal people-to-people understanding, and promote partnerships that advance common interests between Japan and the United States.

    Cultural Exchanges

  • People-to-people exchanges between Japan and the United States strengthen the bilateral relationship and help promote peace and stability in the Asia Pacific region. JUSFC supports legislative exchanges that bring together elected officials from the United States and Japan.

    Encourages Collaboration

  • Educational and cultural exchange between the people of Japan and the United States is the foundation of a strong and healthy U.S.-Japan relationship.  JUSFC encourages collaboration and partnerships between individuals and organizations who share a common interest in supporting the bilateral relationship.

    JUSFC invests in institutions and programs

  • An ever-changing global community faces new challenges and needs a diversity of leaders in Japan and the United States to address them. JUSFC invests in institutions and programs that engage the next generation in the U.S.-Japan dialogue.

     

    Educational and cultural exchange

  • Since its establishment in 1975, one of the ways in which the Commission has supported and sustained the bilateral relationship between the United States and Japan, is by encouraging scholarship related to Japan.

    JUSFC supports academic institutions

News / Blog

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Three Outstanding U.S. Scholars Selected to Participate in 2018 Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan

The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission is delighted to announce that three outstanding scholars from the United States have been selected to participate in the 2018 Fellowship Program for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan. The Fellowship is a joint activity of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Awards support research on modern Japanese society and political economy, Japan’s international relations, and U.S.-Japan relations.

Sakura Christmas

Bowdoin College

“Nomadic Borderlands: Imperial Japan and the Origins of Ethnic Autonomy in Modern China”

Michiko Takeuchi

California State University, Long Beach

“Early Coalitions Between Japanese and American Feminists, from World War I to the U.S. Occupation of Japan”

Robert J. Pekkanen

University of Washington

“Populism in Japan”

For more information on the Fellowship, please visit  NEH’s website.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

U.S.-Japan Creative Artist Fellowships – Deadline Feb. 1, 2018

The Japan U.S. Friendship Commission offers leading contemporary and traditional artists from the United States the opportunity to spend three to five months in Japan through the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program.  The application deadline is February 1, 2018. To learn more, please visit: U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellowship Program

 

Thursday, October 26, 2017

JUSFC Meet Our Grantees Series: Organization of American Historians & Japan Association for American Studies

In 2012 Deborah Dash Moore, Professor of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan, presented her research on American Jewish history in a series of lectures at the University of Kitakyushu in Japan. Her work interested many Japanese students and scholars, particularly women, who found similarities and shared experiences in her seminar.

Moore is one of the many American historians granted a two-week Japan Residencies Program fellowship facilitated by the Organization of American Historians (OAH) and the Japan Association for American Studies (JAAS), with support from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission. Moore, now chair of the OAH/JAAS committee, says “It’s an interaction among a diverse group of people that allows for professional and personal growth, often sparking long-term relationships.”

The program, which began in 1997 sends two OAH scholars to Japan each year. The  awardees travel to assigned host institutions in different parts of Japan. There they offer six lectures to undergraduates and graduate students, creating scholarly dialogue and exchange, and contributing to the expansion of scholarly networks among students and professors of American history in both countries.

The institutional grant from JUSFC has typically covered housing and the seminars. The grant also allows three Japanese graduate students studying in the United States to attend the OAH annual meeting, providing opportunities for networking with other many scholars. In 2017 Rikkyo University and Osaka University hosted the American scholars. “One of the major highlights was having both scholars attend the JAAS annual meeting at Waseda University,” said Professor Akiyo Okuda of Keio University and JAAS… » READ MORE

Site updated on December 13, 2017