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  • Established by Congress in 1975, the Commission plays a prominent role in supporting the robust partnership that has developed between the United States and Japan since 1945.

    Visual Town Hall

  • JUSFC's mission is to support reciprocal people-to-people understanding, and promote partnerships that advance common interests between Japan and the United States.

    Cultural Exchanges

  • People-to-people exchanges between Japan and the United States strengthen the bilateral relationship and help promote peace and stability in the Asia Pacific region. JUSFC supports legislative exchanges that bring together elected officials from the United States and Japan.

    Encourages Collaboration

  • Educational and cultural exchange between the people of Japan and the United States is the foundation of a strong and healthy U.S.-Japan relationship.  JUSFC encourages collaboration and partnerships between individuals and organizations who share a common interest in supporting the bilateral relationship.

    JUSFC invests in institutions and programs

  • An ever-changing global community faces new challenges and needs a diversity of leaders in Japan and the United States to address them. JUSFC invests in institutions and programs that engage the next generation in the U.S.-Japan dialogue.

     

    Educational and cultural exchange

  • Since its establishment in 1975, one of the ways in which the Commission has supported and sustained the bilateral relationship between the United States and Japan, is by encouraging scholarship related to Japan.

    JUSFC supports academic institutions

News / Blog

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Join JUSFC and NEA for Twitter Chat Tonight at 6pm ET for Creative Artists Fellowship

Calling all artists! Join us for a Twitter chat tonight (January 11, 2017) at 6pm Eastern Time with the National Endowment for the Arts to discuss the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program. Connect with program alumni, learn how to apply and get tips and advice during tonight’s chat! Applications are due February 1, 2017.

Follow us on Twitter @J_USFC and hashtag #JUSFC.

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Spring Internship Opportunity

The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission, CULCON and the U.S.-Japan Bridging Foundation (USJBF) in Washington, DC are seeking TWO spring 2017 interns to support current initiatives, which include activities promoting U.S.-Japan cultural, educational and people-to-people exchange. Interns will be working from a small office in a team-oriented and fast-paced environment and will be expected to be both proactive and flexible in completing assignments.

APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR SPRING 2017 INTERNSHIPS: January 4, 2017 . Our goal is to make decisions by January 16 . (This will depend on the interview process.)

The internships are located in Washington, D.C. Minimum 30 hours/week for 6 weeks, 9 am-4 pm.  The internships are unpaid, but interns receive a reimbursement for actual local transportation costs.

Applicants should be current undergraduate or graduate students with an interest in Japan, excellent communication, research, Internet and organizational skills. Some knowledge of the Japanese language is helpful, but not critical. Please send a resume and cover letter to: culcon@jusfc.gov. Please include preferred start and end dates as well as contact information (email and phone) for up to two references.

Additional details about the internship program may be found here.

Friday, December 16, 2016

JUSFC Meet Our Grantees Series: Graham Kolbeins – Writer, Designer, Film Maker

Writer, designer and filmmaker Graham Kolbeins was named a recipient of the 2016 Creative Artist Exchange Fellowship and traveled to Japan in March for three-month residency. Kolbeins was based mostly in Tokyo, but traveled to Osaka, Kyoto, Kobe, Gunma and Okinawa to conduct interviews for his film, Queer Japan.

Queer Japan is an ensemble film that looks at people across the LGBT spectrum and beyond. Kolbeins’ goal was to interview a diverse group who identified as LGBT or other gender categories, and to share their stories of their triumphs and struggles being a sexual minority in Japan.

Kolbeins has worked with a variety of gay artists during the last five years. With his collaborator, Anne Ishii, he traveled to Japan in 2011 and interviewed nine gay manga artists for two books: The Passion of Gengoroh Tagame and Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It. Many of the comics were featured in English for the very first time. Publication and success led to a book tour that allowed Kolbeins to travel throughout North America and Japan.

Following that experience, Kolbeins was hungry to continue learning and researching the different expressions of gender and sexuality in Japan, in the present day as well as during the Edo (1603-1868) and Meiji (1868-1902) periods. He returned to Japan in October 2015 and created a pre-production trailer that served as the foundation for his film.

Certain aspects of Japanese society, such as familial obligations and expectation, make it difficult to be open and fully yourself,… » READ MORE

Site updated on January 19, 2017