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  • Established by Congress in 1975, the Commission plays a prominent role in supporting the robust partnership that has developed between the United States and Japan since 1945.

    Visual Town Hall

  • JUSFC's mission is to support reciprocal people-to-people understanding, and promote partnerships that advance common interests between Japan and the United States.

    Cultural Exchanges

  • People-to-people exchanges between Japan and the United States strengthen the bilateral relationship and help promote peace and stability in the Asia Pacific region. JUSFC supports legislative exchanges that bring together elected officials from the United States and Japan.

    Encourages Collaboration

  • Educational and cultural exchange between the people of Japan and the United States is the foundation of a strong and healthy U.S.-Japan relationship.  JUSFC encourages collaboration and partnerships between individuals and organizations who share a common interest in supporting the bilateral relationship.

    JUSFC invests in institutions and programs

  • An ever-changing global community faces new challenges and needs a diversity of leaders in Japan and the United States to address them. JUSFC invests in institutions and programs that engage the next generation in the U.S.-Japan dialogue.

     

    Educational and cultural exchange

  • Since its establishment in 1975, one of the ways in which the Commission has supported and sustained the bilateral relationship between the United States and Japan, is by encouraging scholarship related to Japan.

    JUSFC supports academic institutions

News / Blog

Monday, May 22, 2017

JUSFC Twitter Chat on Institutional Grants May 25, 2017 3:00pm EDT

Join us for a Twitter chat (May 25, 2017) at 3pm Eastern Daylight Time to discuss JUSFC Institutional Grants. Learn about JUSFC’s grantmaking priorities. Learn how to apply and get tips and advice during the chat! Applications are due July 3, 2017.

Find us on Twitter @J_USFC and hashtag #JUSFC.

Monday, May 8, 2017

JUSFC Meet Our Grantees Series: The National Association of Japan-America Societies

The Japan U.S. Friendship Commission is pleased to support the National Association of Japan America Societies’ (NAJAS) Richard J. Wood Art Curator Series. This program offers a series of talks at Japan-America Societies by curators of Japanese art at major museums in the United States. The participating curators are well known in the field and represent some of the best known collections of Japanese art in the America.

NAJAS facilitates the signature events in this art series by selecting three Japan-America Societies (JAS) as hosts. The three JAS are competitively chosen from amongst NAJAS’ 37 member organizations.

On April 24, 2017, the Japan-America Society of North Carolina (JASNC) hosted the first talk of the 2017 Richard Wood Art Curator Series. “Our goal was to partner with museum curators and share their wonderful collections of Japanese art with Japan-America Society cities throughout the United States.,” explains NAJAS President Peter Kelley. “Curators give presentations about their favorite objects in the home museum’s collection, who the collectors were and why the art is important.”

In North Carolina, Dr. John Carpenter of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art presented the conference’s keynote address at the Ackland Art Museum on the topic, “The Three Perfections of Japanese Art: Painting, Poetry, and Calligraphy – Masterworks from the Mary Griggs Burke Collection,” which is currently on exhibit at The Met. “These human interest stories regarding the collectors are just as appealing as the art,” adds Peter Kelley. “It is important to mix the art with the fascinating… » READ MORE

Thursday, April 13, 2017

JUSFC Meet Our Grantees Series: Alex Dodge – Carpenter, Artist

With degrees in painting from the Rhode Island School of Design and in Interactive Telecommunication from NYU, Alex Dodge’s work combines the promise of technology as it interacts with and shapes human experience. He focuses his attention as an artist between new media and traditional fine art disciplines including painting, printmaking, woodworking and sculpture. His work is in the collections of the Museum

of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston.

Dodge was awarded a JUSFC Creative Artist Fellowship in 2016. He traveled to Japan in October 2016 to pursue his interests in technology and traditional woodworking.

On the technology side, working at a pure code level led him to create generative systems that can build self-evolving sculpture and other art. Dodge put his ideas into motion by experimenting with language, writing code for programs that would generate new words that were statistically similar to real words but did not have any meaning.

“I took a Japanese language class in high school and fell in love with it,” he explains. “Using Japanese as my model, the idea was to create an empty container of meaning that could be experienced much like art.”

These language programs evolved into physical, visual forms, generating billions of unique shapes, similar to Tetris shapes that self-formed and assembled based on the conditions of their environment.

Dodge combined this fascinating project with his interest in Japanese joinery, a form of traditional woodworking. Two years before, he had contacted… » READ MORE

Site updated on May 22, 2017