Archive for March 2017

Two Outstanding U.S. Scholars Selected to Participate in 2017 Fellowships for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan

March 14, 2017 – 

The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission is delighted to announce that two outstanding scholars from the United States have been selected to participate in the 2017 Fellowship Program for Advanced Social Science Research on Japan. The Fellowship is a joint activity of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Awards support research on modern Japanese society and political economy, Japan’s international relations, and U.S.-Japan relations.

Aaron S. Moore Arizona State University Engineering Asian Development: The Cold War and Japan’s Post-Colonial Power in Asia

Amy Borovoy Princeton University Organ Donation and Medical Practices in Modern Japanese Culture

For more information on the Fellowship, please attend NEH’s panel at the Association of Asian Studies’ meeting this week. March 18, 10:45a.m., Birchwood Ballroom, Sheraton Centre Toronto. Please also visit  NEH’s website.

JUSFC to Host Roundtable and Networking Reception at AAS’ Annual Meeting in Toronto, March 16 & 18

March 13, 2017 – 

Who is studying Japanese? And why is Japanese language study important? To address the rising concern within some academic circles in the United States and Japan that Japan Studies as a field is in “crisis”, the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission convened a roundtable discussion at AAS’ annual meeting in March 2016. The program, which drew an audience of nearly 100 faculty and graduate students examined the current trends in Japan Studies; identified the issues that need to be addressed; and solicited recommendations on creating a demand for and diversifying Japan Studies in the United States.

As a follow-up to the 2016 roundtable, the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission is hosting a panel discussion at AAS 2017 to identify solutions by discussing Japanese language study in the context of the broader theme of Japan Studies. The panel will focus on ways to secure interest in and support for Japanese language study amongst the next generation of students.

Please join us on Thursday, March 16, 2017, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Mezzanine, Willow Centre

The conversation will continue on Twitter at @j_usfc #JUSFCJapanStudies

Please also join us at a networking reception. Meet JUSFC Commissioners, staff and grantees. Saturday, March 18, 7:30 to 9:30pm, Chestnut Room, Sheraton Centre Toronto.

The Commission has spent the last four decades supporting the U.S.-Japan relationship through public policy, arts, culture, and educational exchanges. 

 

JUSFC Meet Our Grantees Series: East West Center and the Japan Matters Initiative

March 13, 2017 – 

In 2014 the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission awarded an institutional grant to the East-West Center (EWC) in Washington, D.C. to support their Japan Matters for America website project. With JUSFC’s help, EWC created an online platform that houses comprehensive and multi-activity data to showcase Japan’s critical importance to the United States, and vice versa.  Satu Limaye, Director of EWC in Washington, created the Asia Matters for America initiative. Asia Matters for America brings together ideas of innovation, leadership and international understanding of the overall U.S.-Asia relationship, with a deeper focus on ASEAN, South Korea, Australia, China, India, Taiwan and Japan.

“After we completed the initial Asia Matters for America project, we felt the need to dig deeper into Japan because of its important range of relationships at the national, state and local level,” Satu recalls. The Japan Matters for America initiative launched in 2009 with two initial components — a dual-language publication that provided graphics, analysis and data, followed by populating the website with all the research and data.

“We’re very grateful for JUSFC’s generous support toward this effort,” Satu said. “We could not have built this key interactive resource — for policymakers, congressional members and staff, teachers, students and anyone interested in learning about U.S.-Japan relations — without the initial grant.” When Prime Minister Abe addressed a joint session of Congress in 2015, highlighting the strong relationship between both nations, the Japan Matters for America site was mentioned in a “Dear Colleague” letter.

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JUSFC Meet Our Grantees Series: American Association of Teachers of Japanese

March 6, 2017 – 

JUSFC will host a roundtable discussion at the annual conference of the Association of Asian Studies in Toronto on March 16, 2017 to address why Japanese language study is important and the ways in which to secure interest and support for language study among the next generation of students.  Here, we are highlighting the American Association of Teachers of Japanese (AATJ), a longtime JUSFC grantee, which works to promote study of the Japanese language at all levels of instruction in the field and to broaden and deepen knowledge and appreciation of Japan and its culture.

Since 1997, the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission has been a strong supporter of the American Association of Teachers of Japanese (AATJ). In addition to administering scholarships, AATJ provides support and professional development opportunities for more than 1500 teachers and scholars throughout the United States.

Every year, AATJ awards scholarships to hundreds of students, mostly undergraduate sophomores and juniors. The students who apply and are awarded these scholarships major in Japanese or Asian studies; many are also interested in Japanese art, engineering and popular culture. Susan Schmidt, Executive Director of AATJ, has been with the organization since its establishment and has seen a big culture shift over the years. “Back in the early 1990s, students were interested in Japan because of the business opportunities, whether that meant starting a career in business or physically working in Japan,” Schmidt notes. “In recent years, a lot of young people are interested in the pop culture that has emerged in Japan;… » READ MORE