1999-2000 Biennial Report

Japan-United States Friendship Commission 1999-2000 Biennial Report

 

The Japan-United States Friendship Commission, an independent federal agency, supports training, education and information management to help prepare Americans to meet the challenges and opportunities in the US-Japan relationship of the 21st century. It works through providing grants to cooperating non-profit entities in the following areas:

 

—Japanese Studies in the United States

—Policy-Oriented Research

—Public Affairs/Education

—The Study of the United States in Japan

—The Arts

—Infrastructure Building

A Message From

The Chairman

I am pleased to present the Commission’s Biennial Report for Fiscal Years 1999 and 2000.

This has been a period of great advancement for the Commission. The amendment to the Commission’s enabling legislation enacted late in 1998 has led to a situation of stable finances for the Commission’s operations, after several years of uncertainty. An inspection of the Commission’s appropriated dollar fund at the end of FY 2000 shows a net gain in the value of the fund after almost five years of drawing on principal and reinvesting interest to help a number of the Commission’s most critical programs keep operating.

This period of financial stability has provided the Commission Board an opportunity for creative thinking about its programs and priorities. During it, the Commission organized several outside reviews and devoted considerable effort to internal discussion of its future direction.

Of greatest concern has been the general notion that the late 1990s has been a period of “Japan passing.” As American attention in foreign affairs has shifted to other parts of the world, and particularly to other areas of Asia, there has in fact been a decline in the sheer volume of attention paid to Japan and US-Japan relations. For its part, the Commission has witnessed a decline in the number of proposals it received for its grantmaking competitions in this period.

While many have decried this situation, the Commission has viewed it as an opportunity. The quantity of attention may have decreased, but the quality has improved immeasurably over this past decade, in the Commission’s view. A decade ago, it was a relatively easy matter for the Board to select the few strong proposals from among the many relatively naive or weak submissions. Now, proposals coming in are virtually all worthy of support. Finding a way to accommodate the broad range of high quality ventures the Commission now sees is far more difficult than in the past, even with its improved financial situation.

It is clear to the Commission that there has been a solid gain in the education of the American public on realities about Japan, and the Commission takes pride in having been one means for having achieved that goal. In light of this, the Board concluded at the end of its two-year review of programs and priorities to maintain them intact, while fine-tuning the exact scope of projects they would support.

This new stable financial base has also resulted in a period of high Commission activism. By this, I refer to the Commission’s interest in shaping the proposals it chooses to support, particularly under the rubric of “Infrastructure Building” as described in the narrative that follows. Here we find a set of highly focused programs to provide an administrative base for newly emerging areas of cultural and educational exchange. The Board has concluded that these programs best fit the Commission’s new financial structure and mission of improving understanding between Japan and the United States. The Commission stands apart in the community of US-Japan funding agencies in its willingness to provide direct support for the administrative costs of startup ventures in research, education and exchange.

I would also like to say a word about the Commission’s most recent field of activity: helping raise funds for the US-Japan Bridging Foundation. In 1993, the bilateral advisory panel CULCON set as its highest priority the goal of increasing the number of American undergraduates studying in Japan. While the Commission, in conjunction with its several counterpart funding organizations, helped organize administrative structures that would facilitate such exchanges, it could not directly address the core issue: the high cost of a year of study in Japan. The Commission does not provide individual fellowships or scholarships.

Thus, in 1998 the Commission created the US-Japan Bridging Foundation, a private-sector non-profit to raise funds for scholarships. It set as its goal a fund of $2M to help send a new wave of undergraduates to study in Japan. Ultimately, the Commission believes, this new generation of “Bridging Scholars” will help establish a track record on US campuses of study abroad programs in Japan for all students, regardless of their majors. Thus far, the Foundation, in cooperation with the Commission, has raised nearly $1M, or half its goal, for its scholarship program. It has also sent Bridging Scholars to Japan for the 1999-2000 and 2000-20001 academic years. We are very encouraged by these results and look forward to successful completion of this campaign.

In closing, I note this is the last report I will be making to you on behalf of the Commission. I would like to thank the many commissioners with whom I have worked so closely over my two terms as Chairman. Each in his or her capacity is admirably equipped to direct this Commission with finely honed professional skills and excellent powers of discretion and judgment. Above all, to a person, the commissioners share a dedication to improving US-Japan educational and cultural relations as a personal goal. I would also like to thank the Commission officers and staff for their outstanding job of managing the affairs of the Commission.

 

 

 

 

 

Richard J. Wood

Chairman

January, 2001

 

The Commission, 1999-2000

Chairman:
Dr. Richard J. Wood* **

President, United Board for Christian

Higher Education in Asia

Dean Emeritus, Yale Divinity School

Vice-Chairman:
Mr. Glen S. Fukushima* **
President & CEO

Cadence Design Systems, Japan

Members:

Mr. Burnill F. Clark**
President & CEO, KCTS TV, Seattle

Mr. Lawrence J. Ellison**
Chairman & CEO, Oracle Corporation

The Honorable Joseph D. Duffey* **
Director, United States Information Agency
(ending January 31, 1999)

The Honorable William E. Ferris, Jr.
Chairman, National Endowment for the Humanities

The Honorable A. Lee Fritschler**
Assistant Secretary of Education for Post-Secondary Education, (from November 17, 1999)

Dr. Carol Gluck* **
George Sansom Professor of Japanese History
Columbia University

The Honorable William Ivey
Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts

Mr. Jeffrey M. Lepon* **
Managing Partner
Lepon McCarthy White & Holzworth, PLLC

The Honorable Evelyn S. Lieberman* **
Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, (from October 15, 1999)

The Honorable David Longanecker**
Assistant Secretary of Education for Post-Secondary Education, (ending June 12, 1999)

The Honorable Stanley Roth**
Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs

Mr. Thomas E. McLain**
Partner, Sidley & Austin

The Honorable Frank H. Murkowski
United States Senate

The Honorable Thomas Petri*
United States House of Representatives

The Honorable John D. Rockefeller IV*
United States Senate

Mr. George H. Takei**
Actor/Writer

Mr. Ira Wolf**
Office of Senator Max Baucus

The Honorable Robert Wise
United States House of Representatives

Staff:
Dr. Eric J. Gangloff
Executive Director

Ms. Margaret P. Mihori
Assistant Executive Director

Ms. Pamela L. Fields
Assistant Executive Director, CULCON

Ms. Roberta S. Stewart
Secretary

Head Office:
1120 Vermont Ave., NW, Suite 925
Washington, DC 20005
Tel. (202) 418-9800
Fax. (202) 418-9802
jusfc@jusfc.gov
www.jusfc.gov

Japan Liaison Office:
c/o Program Office
International House of Japan, Inc.
11-16, Roppongi 5-chome
Minato-ku, Tokyo 106, Japan
Tel. (03) 3470-4611

*Members of the Executive Committee
**Members of the US CULCON Panel

The JUSFC in 1999-2000

The Japan-United States Friendship Commission (JUSFC) is pleased to submit this report on its twenty-third and twenty-fourth years of operations for the period October 1, 1998 to September 30, 2000, which corresponds to the federal Fiscal Years 1999 and 2000.

Background and Overview

The JUSFC is an independent federal agency, dedicated to providing opportunities for research, training, education and exchange between the United States and Japan. In passing the Japan-United States Friendship Act (PL 94-118) in 1975 to establish the Commission, Congress acknowledged the unique character and great importance of the relationship between Japan and the United States, and in particular the need to strengthen its foundation through educational and cultural exchange programs at the people-to-people level. It was searching for the means to develop the knowledge, the leaders and the friendly associations which in turn would improve the likelihood that any problems that might arise on the national level could be resolved on a basis of mutual understanding and respect.

Thus the Congress established the Commission, a unique federal agency whose purpose is to promote friendship and understanding with a single foreign country. In the Friendship Act, it also appropriated the Japan-United States Friendship Trust Fund, an endowment denominated in both yen and dollars with a combined value of approximately $36M at the exchange rate then in effect. These two funds represented a portion of the money paid by Japan to compensate the United States for post-World War II assistance, and for certain public facilities on Okinawa at the time of the reversion of the Ryukyus. The former payment became the yen fund, and the latter the dollar fund. The Commission was authorized to invest the Fund in government obligations, and to expend the interest earnings, subject to annual appropriation, and up to five percent annually of the principal of the Fund to carry out the purposes of the Act. In 1982, the Act was amended to permit the Commission to invest any gifts it may receive and to spend the principal and interest earnings t without reference to the appropriations process. The Act was amended again in 1998 to make the dollar and yen funds interchangeable at the Commission’s discretion, allowing it to seek the highest return on its investments in government obligations in either or both of the two countries.

Although governmental, the Commission operates much like a private foundation. It is composed of a board of eighteen com-missioners and a permanent staff of four. The Board is divided equally between nine senior representatives of the United States government from the legislative and executive branches, and nine private citizens, including the chairman. Of these eighteen, twelve members, including the private citizens and the representatives from the Departments of State and Education, serve ex officio on the Commission by virtue of their appointment to CULCON, a binational advisory board to the two governments in educational and cultural affairs. The Board’s responsibility is to manage the Trust Fund, principally by investing it and using the proceeds to make grants to institutions in the United States and Japan to develop programs of educational and cultural exchange.

The JUSFC mission remains as valid now as when it was established. The relationship between Japan and the United States has no counterpart. In sheer size, in its variety and complexity, and in its mixture of cooperation and competition, friendship and rivalry, it stands alone.

The relationship stands on a fragile base. Obviously, as the history of the past fifty years demonstrates, the United States and Japan have much in common in terms of broad national objectives. In the short term, however, each nation has its own objectives and concerns. Moreover, the record of that relationship shows that differences in thought patterns, value systems, social and economic behavior, decision-making processes and means of communication can readily lead to mutual misunderstanding and friction. There is above all a language barrier that all too often forces each nation to react to the other through stereotypes. There is a severe imbalance in the amount of attention that the media in the two countries devote to each other. Finally, there is growing recognition that many of the problems that exist and persist in the relationship are not amenable to easy solutions occasioned by enhanced cultural understanding alone. We need greater knowledge of the character and causes of these problems, leading to mutual deliberation and wise policy. Clearly, we need new ways of thinking about management of the relationship. It is the Commission’s purpose to help make available the expertise and information necessary both for productive deliberation and effective policy.

The Commission today has a new sense of purpose and a more focused program of activity to meet the conditions both of its financial management and of the bilateral relationship. It asks that the projects it supports take cognizance of the contemporary relationship and each in its own way contribute back to the public good that Congress envisioned and sought to embody in PL 94-118.

Program Highlights

1. Japanese Studies in American Education

The Commission pursues as its fundamental mandate the promotion of expertise on Japan throughout the American public. Its primary means of accomplishing this goal is through the maintenance of the vitality of Japanese studies in institutions of American higher education and associated professional organizations. Thus, as has been the case in previous years, Japanese studies in American education remains the largest single category of Commission support in this period.

To help support basic research in the field, the Commission continued its practice in both fiscal years of making block grants to the Social Science Research Council and the Northeast Asian Council of the Association for Asian Studies. These two organizations provide support from the Commission’s grants for individual research projects on the contemporary Japanese political economy and society, selected through peer review. In support of Japanese language library collections and information management, the Commission continued its support of the North American Coordinating Council for Japanese Library Resources. In support of advanced Japanese language training, the Commission continued to provide major support to the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama. In addition, it made a major grant to the Association of Teachers of Japanese (ATJ) in FY 2000 to begin a two-year assessment of the state of advanced Japanese language training available to American university students. Also, it provided support in FY 1999 for two years’ effort to build, under its infrastructure building initiative, the Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese (AATJ). This new coordinating structure will help create a seamless transition of Japanese language study from the K-12 level into the university as its work progresses, as well as a unified Japanese language standard.

The close relationship between the Commission and CULCON has also led to a high degree of coordination between Commission support in Japanese studies and CULCON projects. In the two fiscal years under report, the most significant expressions of this close coordination were the Commission’s continued support of administration of the Bridging Project Clearinghouse inside the ATJ, continued support of the faculty and curriculum development project first at the AAC&U and later at the University of Pennsylvania, and in particular, support for the US-Japan Bridging Foundation, which serves to raise funds to help send more US undergraduates to study in Japan, a longstanding CULCON priority.

2. The Study of the United States in Japanese Education

This category, perhaps more than any other in the period under report, demonstrates the Commission’s new sense of activism in shaping programs to its own interest and specifications. During this period the Commission continued its longstanding support of a program of exchanges between members of the American Studies Association of the United States and of the Japanese Association of American Studies, as well as between members of the Organization of American Historians and their colleagues in Japan. Satisfied with the results of these two projects, the Commission approached the American Political Science Association to begin a similar project in FY 2000 of short-term exchanges and residencies in the two countries. Again, in FY 2000 it initiated discussions with the Economic History Association to begin a similar program in the future. Through this approach, the Commission aims to achieve two goals: first, to expand opportunities for Japanese academics and graduate students to interact with colleagues from the United States and develop networks for future research and exchange; and second, to help further the process of the internationalization of American studies in the United States.

3. Policy-Oriented Research

Since the mid-1980s, the Commission has made a concerted effort to take an active stance vis-à-vis the US-Japan relationship and the serious policy challenges facing both countries in learning to manage that relationship more effectively. It has done this by placing emphasis on support of policy research projects. The Commission places high priority on projects that deal with US-Japan economic, political and security policies.

In sponsoring policy research projects the Commission intends that the results of these research efforts be pertinent to policymakers concerned with Japan in the Congress, the executive branch, various think tanks, academe and the media. It also bases consideration of support of proposals on the degree to which the project directors can assure the Commission of a solid dissemination plan to take the results of the research to those most concerned with policies that guide US management of the bilateral relationship.

Of particular interest in FY 1999 were projects to convene a trilateral US-Japan-China dialog on weapons proliferation control, and research projects on Japan’s domestic competition policies and on the structural rigidities in Japan’s domestic economy. In FY 2000, of particular interest was a project in the politics of Japan’s telecommunications deregulation. In both fiscal years, the Commission continued its support of a program to train young academics and journalists in Japan in policy dialog through a fellowship program at the Research Institute for Peace and Security in Tokyo.

4. Public Affairs/Education

In this category, the Commission endeavors to meet the growing demand for information on Japan throughout the United States. It emphasizes projects that disseminate information on major issues and potential areas of cooperation between the two countries. These projects fall under two sub-headings: Counterpart Exchanges and Media.

In the area of counterpart exchanges, the Commission continued to give highest priority to legislative exchange programs between the United States and Japan. In FY 1999 and FY 2000, these included the US-Japan Economic Agenda Legislative Exchange Program at George Washington University for meetings between Japanese Diet members and the members of the US Congress, and the United States Association of Former Members of Congress for the Congressional Japanese Study Group. For exchanges in the US Senate, the Commission continued its support of the work of the Mansfield Center for Pacific Affairs, most recently in FY 2000. In addition, through the Congressional Economic Leadership Institute, the Commission continued its program of support for week-long study tours of Japan by senior congressional staff. The Commission will continue to place priority on support for legislative exchanges for the foreseeable future.

Of particular interest in the Commission’s support of programs in the media was the application of its infrastructure building initiative to the emerging field of multimedia. In FY 1999 the Commission made its last administrative grant to the Japan Connection, a multimedia production center housed at KCTS TV of Seattle that produces a wide variety of informative programming for multimedia outlets. In FY 2000, it made its first grant to the Japan Connection in direct support of a documentary production project, to help launch a three-part series on the story of the Japanese-American experience in the United States for broadcast on high definition TV.

Again, under the infrastructure building initiative, and as a result of the most recent CULCON initiative, the Commission made a grant in FY 1999 to San Diego State University for technical assistance in building a new bilingual website to document US-Japan cultural and educational exchange and mutual influence in the postwar era. This will be previewed at the CULCON XX plenary session in Los Angeles in May, 2001.

Perhaps of greatest significance in this category was the termination of the Commission’s long-standing program of support for the startup costs of new Japan America societies in the United States. Begun with gifts from the Japanese government in the 1980s, the Commission expended the last of these special gift funds in FY 1999. Beginning with only a few societies in the major cities on the two coasts, the Commission views the current network of over 35 societies spread across the United States as one of its great success stories. These societies, and its parent organization, the National Association of Japan-America Societies, play a major role in the education of the American public on contemporary Japanese society and culture and in the management of the relationship at regional and local levels. In the future the Commission will consider support only for public affairs programs that can be shared among the societies nationwide.

 

5. The Arts

The Commission continues to support projects in the arts of the highest merit, in the firm belief that they can help foster better understanding between the two countries at a time when they face increasing strain over trade deficits and other current issues. It recognizes that it must take an increasingly selective approach to funding in this field, given pressure in other program areas. Thus beginning in FY 1999, the Commission set as its priority in the arts support for projects to send American exhibitions and performing arts to Japan.

In both fiscal years the Commission continued to work closely with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs in sponsoring the US-Japan Creative Artists Exchange Fellowship Program. The annual competition for the five fellowships draws hundreds of applications from established artists in a wide range of disciplines from throughout the United States. The recipients spend six months in Japan, immersed in Japanese culture and its manifestations in their particular fields and training in the arts. In addition, the Commission continued to provide support to the International House of Japan to hire an expert to facilitate the program on site. In FY 2000, the Commission upgraded the program by adding a fund for resident Fellows to use for collaborative projects while they are in Japan.

Once again, building on the synergy developed between CULCON and the Commission, the latter provided a grant to the Japanese American National Museum of Los Angeles in FY 2000 to showcase the work of selected participants of the Creative Artists Exchange Fellowship Program. The Museum will be the site of the CULCON XX plenary session in May, 2001. On this occasion, the Commission will not only display the talents of the American artists who have enriched their art through the experience of a residency in Japan, but also hold a public discussion on the effect that international exchange has on artistic creativity.

6. CULCON

CULCON (the US-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange), a binational advisory panel to the governments of the United States and of Japan, serves to focus official and public attention in both countries on the vital cultural and educational underpinnings of the bilateral relationship. Its origins lie in discussion held in 1961 between President John F. Kennedy and Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda.

Beginning in 1978, CULCON became a program of the United States Information Agency, reverting to Department of State oversight with the consolidation of foreign affairs agencies in 1999. In 1991, permanent secretariats were established in Tokyo and Washington to provide continuity to CULCON activities. The US Secretariat was established inside the JUSFC. Since 1991, US CULCON has become a highly visible, proactive organization, emphasizing the implementation of CULCON recommendations, frequently with the Commission’s professional and financial support.

In the 1990s, CULCON activity focused on two primary working groups: undergraduate educational exchange and information access. There also was considerable activity in media cooperation. Breaking with precedent, CULCON held its nineteenth plenary session outside Tokyo and Washington, in Naha, Okinawa in February, 1999. CULCON XIX provided the opportunity to review activities to date and to recommend a new joint initiative in digital archiving. Since then, the work of the Digital Culture Working Group has been the highest priority of CULCON, helping it harness the power of the Internet to its mission of improving educational and cultural relations between the two countries.

Support for this Working Group has been provided by the Commission in the form of a grant to San Diego State University to help build this archive, the Digital Cultural Resource, an innovative teaching resource on US-Japan cultural and educational relations over the past fifty years. This and several other important CULCON initiatives have provided the impetus for much of the Commission’s new activism in shaping the projects that it supports. The record of this new cooperation between the two entities is found in the narrative of the Commission’s grantmaking activities in 1999 and 2000 in Sections 1-5 above.

NOTE: In the listings below, in many cases Commission support met only partial costs of the total project.

Grants Awarded in Fiscal Year 1999

October 1, 1998 – September 30, 1999

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

A.     JAPANESE STUDIES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION      
      Faculty and Curriculum Development      
  1. Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) – for support of a faculty and curriculum development seminar on Japan

70,725

 
  2. The University of Pennsylvania – for continued support of a faculty and curriculum development seminar on Japan in FY 2000

71,875

 
      Language      
  3. Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese –for infrastructure support for the Alliance for a two-year period

148,750

 
  4. Stanford University, for the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama – for advanced Japanese language training for American graduate students  

40,000,000

  Libraries      
  5. International House of Japan – for provision of information on the Internet regarding International House’s library resources  

5,500,000

 

 

 

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

  6. National Coordinating Committee on Japanese Library Resources – for support of continuation and expansion of activities for FY 1999 and support of the National Program for Coordinated Japanese Library Acquisitions of Multi-Volume Sets, and for a planning meeting of Japanese librarians to set an agenda for the coming decade

91,444

10,000,000

  Professional Development      
  7. Association of Teachers of Japanese – for scholarship and administrative support of Bridging Project Clearinghouse for Study Abroad in Japan

85,935

 
  Research      
  8. Association for Asian Studies, Inc. – for the various programs of the Northeast Asia Council of the Association to promote the teaching and study of Japan in the United States for FY 1999 and FY 2000

124,832

7,200,000

  9. Social Science Research Council – for fellowship and administrative support for advanced research on Japan by American scholars

80,575

6,000,000

  Other      
  10. Pacific Basin Institute – for support of the project “Japan And America: The Near and Far Future”

6,000

 
TOTAL FOR JAPANESE STUDIES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION    

$680,136

¥68,700,000

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

B.     THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPANESE EDUCATION      
  Research Centers      
  1. Doshisha University, Center for American Studies –for support of the activities of the Center  

2,330,000

  Faculty and Curriculum Development      
  2. American Studies Association – for support of Years Two and Three of the project “Japan-United States Dialogues Across the Pacific: Globalization and American Studies”

8,000

2,100,000

  3. Organization of American Historians –for support of Years Three and Four of the project “Short-term Residencies in Japan for US Historians” and for development of a collaborative network of scholarly exchanges among historians in Japan and the US

20,594

3,891,312

  Other      
  4. New York Foundation for the Arts – for support of the project “Conversation Continued”

22,680

 
TOTAL FOR THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPANESE EDUCATION    

$51,274

¥8,321,312

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

C.     POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH      
  1. The Brookings Institution – for support of the project “Japan’s Structural Rigidities”

50,000

 
  2. Economic Strategy Institute – for support of the projects “A WTO Competition Policy Agreement and US-Japanese Trade Relations” and “Japan and the United States Reconsidered: The Evolution of Japanese Security and Economic Strategy Since 1960”

101,323

 
  3. Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies – for support of the project “Bridging the Antitrust Divide in US-Japan Relations”

10,005

 
  4 Japan Information Access Project – for support of the projects “Pentagon Study Group on Japan & Northeast Asia” and “American Scholarship on Japan: A Program for Public Policy Dissemination”

144,475

 
  5. The Mansfield Center for Pacific Affairs – for support of the project “The Rule of Law and Its Acceptance in Asia”

43,900

 
  6. Pacific Forum CSIS – for support of Year One of the project “United States, Japan and China: Developing Stable Trilateral Ties”

20,350

 
  7. Research Institute for Peace and Security – for support of Year Two of the project “Strategic Studies Fellowship Program”  

1,660,000

  8. University of Colorado, Boulder – for support of the project “Patent Systems, Licensing Agreements, and Joint Ventures in the Context of US-Japan Competition Policy”

25,662

 

 

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

  9. University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc. – for support of the project “Efforts to Control Weapons Proliferation: Japan, the People’s Republic of China and the United States.”

40,250

 
TOTAL FOR POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH    

$435,965

¥1,660,000

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

D.     PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION      
  Outreach Programs      
  1. Japan-America Society of New Mexico – for administrative support for the third and final year

30,000

 
  2. Japan Society of San Diego – for administrative support for the third and final year

30,000

 
  3. National Association of Japan-America Societies –for support of the teleconference project “2020 Vision: A Digital Road Map for Policies and Priorities in the US-Japan Relationship for the 21st Century” and for support of the NAJAS 20th anniversary conference

77,319

 
  Counterpart Exchanges      
  4. Congressional Economic Leadership Institute – for support of the project “1999 US-Japan Educational Exchange Program”

41,900

4,180,000

  5. The George Washington University – for support of the project “GWU US-Japan Economic Agenda Legislative Exchange Program for 1999”

110,539

1,950,000

  6. International House of Japan –for services for American educational, cultural and professional institutions for FY 1999 and FY 2000  

17,000,000

  7. Japan Center for International Exchange, Inc. – for support of the project “US-Japan Legislative Policy Dialogue Project on Common Challenges of Governance and Their Implications on Enhancing the Cooperative US-Japan Relationship”

30,000

 
  8. US Association of Former Members of Congress – for support of the project “Congressional Study Group on Japan” and other congressional exchange programs

35,616

 
Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

  Media and Dissemination      
  9. Japan Information Access Project – for support of the project “American Scholarship on Japan: A Dissemination Plan”

50,000

 
  10. Japan Policy Research Institute – for support of the documentary “Cold War Island: The Battle for Okinawa”

15,000

 
  11. KCTS Television – for support of Year Three of the project “Japan Connection: A Multi-media Production Center”

75,000

 
  12. Pacific Basin Institute – for support of the project “Bridge to the Rising Sun”

27,275

 
  13. San Diego State University – for support of the

project “Digital Culture Resource”

125,209

 
TOTAL FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION    

$647,858

¥23,130,000

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

E.     THE ARTS      
  1. Exchange Fellowships for Creative Artists –Jointly sponsored program funded by the JUSFC and the

US National Endowment for the Arts. The funds devoted to this program include $75,000 received from the National Endowment for the Arts. Grant funds for the artists in FY 1999 are administered in Japan for the Commission by the International House of Japan, Inc. Yen funds are provided for the ensuing program year.

Artists sponsored under the exchange fellowships:

John Farrell

Jeanne Larsen

Juliet Kono Lee

Robert Martin

Kim Teru Yasuda

23,445

21,040,000

      American Performances and Exhibitions in Japan      
  2. Studio Malaparte – for support of a collaborative workshop with film director Rob Nilsson  

1,000,000

  3. Yokohama Museum of Art – for support of a retrospective of the works of Frederick Wiseman  

2,000,000

      Japanese Performances and Exhibitions in the United States      
  4. Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History – for support of publication of the educational catalog accompanying the exhibit “Ainu–Spirit of a Northern People”

50,000

 
TOTAL FOR THE ARTS    

$73,445

¥24,040,000

 

 

 

Commission Program Totals    

 
    Japanese Studies in American Education

$ 680,136

¥ 68,700,000

    The Study of the United States in Japanese Education

51,274

8,321,312

    Policy-Oriented Research

435,965

1,660,000

    Public Affairs/Education

647,858

23,130,000

    The Arts

73,445

24,040,000

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION PROGRAMS    

$1,888,678

¥125,851,312

CULCON Activities

(Funded by Transfer from US Information Agency)

    Undergraduate Educational Exchange Oversight

Committee

$ 2,270

 
    Information Access Working Group

3,760

 
    Digital Culture Working Group

11,680

 
    CULCON XIX Plenary Session

42,450

 
TOTAL FOR CULCON ACTIVITIES    

$60,160

 
Administrative Expenses of the Commission in FY 1999
    Personnel

$328,905

 
    General Services Administration for Payroll, Accounting and Other Services

34,483

 
    Office Space

36,174

 
    Travel

10,368

 
    Communications

7,757

 
    Printing, Supplies, Publications

12,941

 
    Equipment

4,411

 
    Other

28,219

 
TOTAL FOR COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS    

$463,258

 
   
Fundraising Expenses of the Commission in FY 1999  
    Travel

2,720

 
    Communications

1,178

 
    Consultant fee

47,865

 
TOTAL FOR COMMISSION FUNDRAISING COSTS    

$51,763

 
 
Administrative Expenses of CULCON in FY 1999
    Personnel

$91,711

 
    Communications

200

 
    Supplies

200

 
    Other

200

 
TOTAL FOR CULCON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS    

$92,311

 

 

Appropriated Dollar Fund Income and Expense Statement

Fiscal Year 1999

(10-1-98 through 9-30-99)

  INCOME      
    Net Interest (Earned Basis)

$2,795,950

 
    Refunds on Grants

79,039

 
    Received from US Airforce

68,000

 
    Received from the National Endowment for the Arts

75,000

 
    Received from the US Information Agency for CULCON support

152,471

 
  TOTAL INCOME  

$3,170,460

 
  EXPENSES      
    Commission Grants

$1,888,678

 
    Commission Administration

463,258

 
    Fundraising Expenses

51,763

 
    CULCON Activities

60,160

 
    CULCON Administration

92,311

 
  TOTAL EXPENSE  

$2,556,170

 
    GAIN OR (LOSS)

$614,290

 

 

Appropriated Dollar Fund Balance

Fiscal Year 1999

(10-1-98 through 9-30-99)

    Original Appropriation, 1-1-76

$18,000,000

 
    Fund Balance, 9-30-98

15,537,275

 
    Income or (loss)

614,290

 
    Transfer from Yen Account

27,588,192

 
  BALANCE, 9-30-99  

$43,739,757

 
Gift Fund (non-appropriated)

Fiscal Year 1999

(10-1-98 through 9-30-99)

    Balance, 9-30-98

$3

 
    Grants

0

 
    Administrative Expenses

2,622

 
    Refunds on Grants

10,139

 
  BALANCE, 9-30-99  

$7,520

 
Bridging Project Gift Fund (non-appropriated)

Fiscal Year 1999

(10-1-98 through 9-30-99)

    Balance, 9-30-98

$112,614

 
    Cash/Par

1,230

 
    Contributions

70,000

 
    Grants

185,000

 
    Administrative Expenses

125

 
    Interest

2,487

 
  BALANCE, 9-30-99  

$1,206

 

 

Appropriated Yen Fund Income and Expense Statement

Fiscal Year 1999

(10-1-98 through 9-30-99)

  INCOME      
    Cash  

131,946,163

    Interest  

20,000

    Refunds on Grants  

966,039

  TOTAL INCOME    

¥132,932,202

  EXPENSES      
    Grants  

¥125,851,312

    Administration  

6,156,905

    Fees  

3,314,463

  TOTAL EXPENSE    

¥135,322,680

  GAIN OR (LOSS)    

(¥2,390,478)

Appropriated Yen Fund Balance
    Original Appropriation Received, 11-1-76  

¥3,615,429,455

    Balance Received, 10-22-79  

325,683,316

    Fund Balance, 9-30-98  

3,295,868,834

    Income or (loss)  

(¥2,390,478)

  Funds Transferred to Dollar Account    

3,293,478,356

  BALANCE, 9-30-99    

¥0

 

NOTE: In the listings below, in many cases Commission support met only partial costs of the total project.

Grants Awarded in Fiscal Year 2000

October 1, 1999 – September 30, 2000

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

A.     JAPANESE STUDIES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION      
  Faculty and Curriculum Development      
  1. University of Pennsylvania – for continued support of the project “The 2000 Faculty and Curriculum Development Seminar on Japan”

98,125

 
  Language      
  2. Association of Teachers of Japanese – for support of the project “Assessment of Advanced Japanese Training”

84,053

 
  3. Stanford University, for the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama – for advanced Japanese language training for American graduate students  

40,000,000

  Libraries      
  4. Association of Research Libraries – for support of the project “Improving Access to Japanese Serials and Newspapers”

21,400

 
  5. North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources – for continuation and expansion of activities, and support of the National Program for Coordinated Japanese Library Acquisitions of Multi-Volume Sets and External User Services for FY 2000

68,750

10,000,000

 

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

  Professional Studies      
  6. Association of Teachers of Japanese – for scholarship and administrative support of Bridging Project Clearinghouse for Study Abroad in Japan

80,945

 
  7. Columbia University, The Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture – for support of the project “The Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature”

19,157

 
  Research      
  8. Princeton University – for support of the project “National Identity and Public Policy in Comparative Perspective”

8,652

 
  9. Social Science Research Council –for fellowship and administrative support for advanced research on Japan by American scholars

82,500

6,000,000

TOTAL FOR JAPANESE STUDIES IN AMERICAN EDUCATION    

$463,582

¥56,000,000

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

B.     THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPANESE EDUCATION      
  Faculty and Curriculum Development      
  1. American Political Science Association – for support of the workshop entitled “Women and Politics in Comparative Perspective”

37,918

 
  2. SFC Institute, Keio University – for support of the seminar entitled “The Analysis of the Loci of ‘America’ in Japan Today”

27,600

 
TOTAL FOR THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPANESE EDUCATION    

$65,518

¥0

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

C.     POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH      
  1. Harvard University – for support of the project “Civil Society in the Asia-Pacific”

50,000

 
  2. The Nautilus Institute – for support of the project “Policy Assessment of East Asia Theater Missile Defense and US National Policy”

38,020

 
  3. Purdue University – for support of the project “The Politics of Telecommunication Regulation”

78,360

 
  4. Research Institute for Peace and Security – for support of the third and final year of the project “Strategic Studies Fellowship Program”  

865,000

TOTAL FOR POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH    

$166,380

¥865,000

Grants Awarded    

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

D.     PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION      
  Outreach Programs      
  1. Capital Children’s Museum – for support of the project “Japan: Through the Eyes of a Child”

5,000

 
  2. Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies – for support of the project “Okinawa and its Relationship with the United States: The G7 Summit Meeting and Beyond”

5,000

   
  3. Global Film Network – for support of a project to screen the documentary “After America…After Japan”

10,000

   
  4. Japan-America Society of Washington, DC – for support of the project “21st Annual National Association of Japan-America Societies Conference”

28,693

 
  5. National Association of Japan-America Societies – for support of updating “On The Record” data, and the project “2020 Vision: A Digital Road Map for Policies and Priorities in the US-Japan Relationship in the 21st Century”

59,761

 
  6. New York Foundation for the Arts – for support of Year Two of the project “Conversation Continued”

49,680

 
  Counterpart Exchanges      
  7. The George Washington University –for support of the project “GWU US-Japan Economic Agenda 2000 Legislative Exchange Program”

116,647

1,950,000

  8. The Mansfield Center for Pacific Affairs – for support of the project “The Mansfield Study Group on Asia”

50,000

 

 

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

  9. US Association of Former Members of Congress – for support of the project “Congressional Study Group on Japan”

31,000

 
  Media/Dissemination      
  10. Catticus Corporation – for support of the documentary “Sumo East and West”

25,000

 
  11. KCTS Television – for support of the documentary “The Japanese-American Saga”

100,000

 
TOTAL FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION    

$480,781

¥1,950,000

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

E.     THE ARTS      
  1. Exchange Fellowships for Creative Artists – Jointly sponsored program funded by the JUSFC and the US National Endowment for the Arts. The funds devoted to this program include $75,000 received from the National Endowment for the Arts. Grant funds for the artists in FY 2000 are administered in Japan for the Commission by the International House of Japan, Inc. Yen funds are provided for the ensuing program year. Yen funds for FY 2000 include funds for collaborative projects carried out in Japan by the Creative Artist fellows.

Artists sponsored under the exchange fellowships:

Barbara Allen

Gene Coleman

Maureen Fleming

David Mazzacchelli

William Pope. L

$24,719

19,080,000

      American Performances and Exhibitions in Japan      
  2. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles– for support of the project “Public Offerings: The Avant-Garde and the Art School in the 90s”

30,000

 
  3. New York City Ballet – for support of the project “New York City Ballet’s Tour to Japan”

40,000

 
  4. Ontological-Hysteric Theater – for support of the project “Ontological-Hysteric Theater Japan Tour 2000”

45,000

 

 

 

 

Grants Awarded

   

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

      Other      
  5. CEC International Partners, Inc. – for support of the screening process to review the FY 2001 applications to the US/Japan Creative Artists Fellowship Program

2,540

 
  6. Japanese American National Museum – for support of the project “Celebrating the Japan-US Friendship Commission Creative Artists Fellowship Program”

86,100

 
  7. San Diego State University Foundation – for support of the project “The Establishment of a Student Exchange Program Between SDSU’s Furniture Design Program and Takumi-Jyuku, a Woodworking School in Gifu, Japan”

15,060

 
TOTAL FOR THE ARTS    

$243,419

¥19,080,000

Commission Program Totals

As of September 30, 2000

       
    Japanese Studies in American Education

$463,582

¥56,000,000

    The Study of the United States in Japanese Education

65,518

0

    Policy-Oriented Research

166,380

865,000

    Public Affairs/Education

480,781

1,950,000

    The Arts

243,419

19,080,000

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION PROGRAMS    

$1,419,680

¥77,895,000

CULCON Activities

(Funded by Transfer from US Department of State)

    Information Access Working Group

800

 
    Digital Culture Working Group

11,725

 
TOTAL FOR CULCON ACTIVITIES    

$12,525

 
Administrative Expenses of the Commission in FY 2000

As of September 30, 2000

    Personnel

340,121

 
    General Services Administration for Payroll, Accounting and Other Services

40,755

 
    Office Space

46,278

 
    Travel

59,483

 
    Communications

8,816

 
    Printing, Supplies, Publications

5,619

 
    Equipment

76

 
    Other

50,015

 
TOTAL FOR COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS    

$551,163

 
   
Fundraising Expenses of the Commission in FY 2000  
    Travel

10,600

 
    Communications

100

 
    Consultant fee

14,000

 
TOTAL FOR COMMISSION FUNDRAISING COSTS    

$24,700

 
Administrative Expenses of CULCON in FY 2000
    Personnel

96,943

 
    Communications

190

 
    Supplies

180

 
    Other

225

 
TOTAL FOR CULCON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS    

$97,538

 

 

 

Appropriated Dollar Fund Income and Expense Statement

Fiscal Year 2000

(10-1-99 through 9-30-00)

  INCOME      
    Net Interest (Earned Basis)

$2,746,320

 
    Refunds on Grants

106,519

 
    Received from the US National Endowment for the Arts

75,000

 
    Received from US Department of State

110,063

 
  TOTAL INCOME  

3,037,902

 
  EXPENSES      
    Commission Dollar Grants

1,419,680

 
    Dollar Equivalent of Yen Grants

742,759

 
    Commission Administration

551,163

 
    Fundraising Activities

24,700

 
    CULCON Activities

12,525

 
    CULCON Administration

97,538

 
  TOTAL EXPENSE  

2,848,365

 
  GAIN OR (LOSS)  

189,537

 
         

 

Appropriated Dollar Fund Balance

Fiscal Year 2000

(10-1-99 through 9-30-00)

    Original Appropriation, 1-1-76

$18,000,000

 
    Fund Balance, 9-30-99

43,739,757

 
    Income or (loss)

189,537

 
  BALANCE, 9-30-00  

$43,929,294

 
Gift Fund (non-appropriated)

Fiscal Year 2000

(10-1-99 through 9-30-00)

    Balance, 9-30-99

$ 7,520

 
    Grants

15,000

 
    Administrative Expenses

10,965

 
    Contributions

24,058

 
    Refunds on Grants

0

 
  BALANCE, 9-30-00  

$ 5,613

 
Bridging Project Gift Fund (non-appropriated)

Fiscal Year 2000

(10-1-99 through 9-30-00)

         
    Balance, 9-30-99

$1,2060

 
    Cash/Par

0

 
    Grants

0

 
    Administrative Expenses

1,274

 
    Interest

75

 
  BALANCE, 9-30-00  

$7