2001–2002 Biennial Report

Japan-United States Friendship Commission 2001–2002 Biennial Report

The Japan-United States Friendship Commission, an independent federal agency, supports training, education and information management to help prepare Americans to meet the challenges and opportunities in the US-Japan relationship of the 21st century.  It works through providing grants to non-profit entities in the following areas:

—Japanese Studies in the United States

—Public Affairs/Education

—The Study of the United States in Japan

—The Arts

A Message From The Chairman

 

I am pleased to present the Commission’s Biennial Report for Fiscal Years 2001 and 2002.

Ten days after the horrific events of September 11, 2001, I attended my first meeting of the Japan-US Friendship Commission.  In the weeks and months following 9/11, as America reassessed its position in the global community and prepared for a transition in its thinking and actions, a transition was also taking place at the Commission.

Two-thirds of the Commission’s eighteen members changed in the period covered by this report, and I became Chairman on October 1, 2001.  Over the past year, the new board has looked closely at the Commission’s mission with the aim of examining the challenges that face the bilateral relationship in a new global context.  In this fluid world, how can the Commission address these challenges in a significant and timely fashion?  While the base of expertise on Japan in the United States remains strong and meaningful, there are changes to the Commission’s guidelines that reflect the commissioners’ response to this new situation.

Chief among the changes is elimination of support for Policy Research and Infrastructure Building as separate categories.  The Commission has not eliminated support for these fields per se; rather, it has incorporated support for these activities under its programs for Japanese Studies and the Study of the United States, as a way to emphasize its highest priority:  the development and maintenance of area studies expertise on the societies, political economies and cultures of the United States and Japan and on the bilateral relationship.

As my friend and colleague Richard Wood – chairman in the first half of the period covered in this report – reported to you in the last biennial report, the Commission’s financial base remains stable. The Commission continues to receive more proposals worthy of support than it can afford to fund, and the issue of how to accommodate the broad range of high quality ventures remains a challenge for the current Board.  It looks forward to this challenge in an era of increasingly diminished resources for US-Japan exchanges.

I would like to say a word about CULCON, a binational advisory panel to the US and Japanese governments that I chair concurrently with the Commission. While Richard Wood was still at the helm of the US CULCON Panel, CULCON held its twentieth plenary session in Los Angeles in May, 2001. The meeting represented a departure from CULCON’s past in two important ways.

First, never before had a CULCON plenary session in the US been held outside of Washington, DC. The venue itself, the Japanese American National Museum, highlighted the theme of American cultural diversity that infused the proceedings.

Second, CULCON agreed at the plenary session to push ahead further than it ever had before in developing a CULCON website as a teaching resource on US-Japan educational and cultural relations over the past fifty years. We look forward to our next CULCON plenary session in November, 2003 in Sendai, Japan with this level of implementation as a precedent.

Under the current leadership of Commissioner Patricia Steinhoff, an accomplished team at the University of Hawaii and a counterpart team in Japan are developing this project.  Cross Currents, as it is known, is unique for many reasons, one of which is that it is a truly binational project, another of which is that it is creating a new field of scholarship in looking carefully at the junctures where interaction between the two cultures has had significant influence.

I would also like to say a word about the Commission’s most recent field of activity:  helping raise funds for the US-Japan Bridging Foundation.  In 1993, CULCON set as its highest priority the goal of increasing the number of American undergraduates studying in Japan.  While the Commission, in conjunction with its several counterpart funding organizations, helped organize administrative structures that would facilitate such exchanges, it could not directly address the core issue:  the high cost of a year of study in Japan.  The Commission does not provide individual fellowships or scholarships.

 

Thus, in 1998 the Commission created the US-Japan Bridging Foundation, a private sector non-profit to raise funds for scholarships.  It set as its goal a cash fund of $2M to help send a new wave of undergraduates to study in Japan.  The Foundation has succeeded beyond our expectations.  Thus far it has:

 

  • Raised $1.8M for scholarships;
  • Awarded 291 scholarships for US undergraduates to study in Japan;
  • Garnered support from over 30 corporations, foundations, and individuals;
  • Increased the goal from 400 to 500 scholarships awarded by setting a new target of $2.5M for its fundraising campaign;
  • Obtained financial self-sufficiency from the Commission.

 

I would like to congratulate the Foundation and all the members of its board and staff who have worked so hard to achieve its successes to date.

 

In closing, I would like to thank the commissioners with whom I am working closely to effect change in the Commission, CULCON and the Bridging Foundation.  I would also like to thank the Commission officers and staff for their outstanding job of managing the affairs of the Commission.

 

 

 

 

 

Richard J. Samuels

Chairman

February, 2003

 

 

The Commission, 2001-2002

 

 

 

The Board as of October 1, 2000

 

 


Chairman:
Dr. Richard J. Wood* **
President, United Board for Christian
Higher Education in Asia

Vice-Chairman:
Mr. Glen S. Fukushima* **
President & CEO
Cadence Design Systems, Japan

Members:
Mr. Burnill F. Clark**
President & CEO, KCTS TV, Seattle

Mr. Lawrence J. Ellison**
Chairman & CEO, Oracle Corporation

The Honorable William E. Ferris, Jr.
Chairman, National Endowment for the
Humanities

The Honorable A. Lee Fritschler**
Assistant Secretary of Education for Post-
Secondary Education

Dr. Carol Gluck* **
George Sansom Professor of Japanese
History
Columbia University

The Honorable William Ivey
Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts

Mr. Jeffrey M. Lepon* **
Managing Partner
Lepon McCarthy White & Holzworth, PLLC

The Honorable Evelyn S. Lieberman* **
Undersecretary of State for Public Diplomacy
and Public Affairs

The Honorable Stanley Roth**
Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian
and Pacific Affairs

Mr. Thomas E. McLain**
Partner, Sidley & Austin

The Honorable Frank H. Murkowski
United States Senate

The Honorable Thomas Petri*
United States House of Representatives

The Honorable John D. Rockefeller IV*
United States Senate

Mr. George H. Takei**
Actor/Writer

Mr. Ira Wolf**
Office of Senator Max Baucus

The Honorable Robert Wise
United States House of Representatives

Staff:
Dr. Eric J. Gangloff
Executive Director

Ms. Margaret P. Mihori
Assistant Executive Director

Ms. Pamela L. Fields
Assistant Executive Director, CULCON

Ms. Roberta S. Stewart
Secretary

Head Office:
1110 Vermont Avenue, NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20005
Tel (202) 418-9800
Fax (202) 418-9802
jusfc@jusfc.gov
www.jusfc.gov

Japan Liaison Office:
c/o Program Office
International House of Japan, Inc.
11-16, Roppongi 5-chome
Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032, Japan
Tel (03) 3470-4611

*Members of the Executive Committee
**Members of the US CULCON Panel

 


The Board as of October 1, 2001 


Chairman:
Dr. Richard J. Samuels* **
Ford International Professor of Political
Science
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Vice-Chairman:
Dr. Amy V. Heinrich* **
Director, CV Starr East Asian Library
Columbia University

Members:
The Honorable Bruce Cole
Chairman, National Endowment for the
Humanities

Dr. Richard E. Dyck**
President, TCS Japan, KK

The Honorable Patricia De Stacy Harrison* **
Assistant Secretary of State for Educational
and Cultural Affairs

The Honorable James A. Kelly**
Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and
Pacific Affairs

Dr. Linda K. Kerber* **
May Brodbeck Professor in Liberal Arts
The University of Iowa

Mr. Theodore R. “Regge” Life, Jr. * **
Filmmaker

Ms. Doris O. Matsui**
Senior Advisor, Collier, Shannon Scott PLLC

The Honorable James McDermott
United States House of Representatives

The Honorable Frank H. Murkowski
United States Senate

The Honorable Thomas E. Petri*
United States House of Representatives

The Honorable John D. Rockefeller, IV*
United States Senate

Mr. Francis Y. Sogi**
Life Partner, Kelley Drye & Warren

 

Mr. Frank P. Stanek**
President, International Business Development
Universal Studios Recreation Group
Universal Studios

Dr. Patricia G. Steinhoff**
Department of Sociology
University of Hawaii

The Honorable Sally Stroup**
Assistant Secretary of Education for Post-
Secondary Education

Chairman
National Endowment for the Arts

Staff:
Dr. Eric J. Gangloff
Executive Director

Ms. Margaret P. Mihori
Assistant Executive Director

Ms. Pamela L. Fields
Assistant Executive Director, CULCON

Ms. Sylvia L. Dandridge
Secretary

Head Office:
1110 Vermont Avenue, NW, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20005
Tel (202) 418-9800
Fax (202) 418-9802
jusfc@jusfc.gov
www.jusfc.gov

Japan Liaison Office:
c/o Program Office
International House of Japan, Inc.
11-16, Roppongi 5-chome
Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-0032, Japan
Tel (03) 3470-4611

*Members of the Executive Committee
**Members of the US CULCON Panel

 

The Japan-US Friendship Commission in 2001-2002

 

The Japan-United States Friendship Commission (“JUSFC”; “Commission”) is pleased to submit this report on its twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth years of operations for the period October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2002, which corresponds to the federal Fiscal Years 2001 and 2002.

 

Background and Overview

 

The JUSFC is an independent federal agency, dedicated to providing opportunities for research, training, education and exchange between the United States and Japan.  In passing the Japan-United States Friendship Act (PL 94-118) in 1975 to establish the Commission, Congress acknowledged the unique character and great importance of the relationship between Japan and the United States, and in particular the need to strengthen its foundation through educational and cultural exchange programs at the people-to-people level.  It was searching for the means to develop the knowledge, the leaders and the friendly associations that in turn would improve the likelihood that any problems that might arise on the national level could be resolved on a basis of mutual understanding and respect.

 

Thus the Congress established the Commission, a unique federal agency in that its purpose is to promote understanding with a single foreign country.  In the Friendship Act, Congress also appropriated the Japan-United States Friendship Trust Fund, an endowment denominated in both yen and dollars with a combined value of approximately $36M at the exchange rate then in effect.  These two funds represented a portion of the money paid by Japan to compensate the United States for post-World War II assistance, and for certain public facilities on Okinawa at the time of the reversion of the Ryukyus.  The former payment became the yen fund, and the latter the dollar fund.  The Commission was authorized to invest the Fund in government obligations, and to expend the interest earnings, subject to annual appropriation, and up to five percent annually of the principal of the Fund to carry out the purposes of the Act.  In 1982, the Act was amended to permit the Commission to invest any gifts it may receive and to spend the principal and interest earnings from gifts without reference to the appropriations process.  The Act was amended again in 1998 to make the dollar and yen funds interchangeable at the Commission’s discretion, allowing it to seek the highest return on its investments in government obligations in either or both of the two countries.

 

Although governmental, the Commission operates much like a private foundation.  It is composed of a board of eighteen commissioners and a permanent staff of four officers.  The Board is divided equally between nine senior representatives of the United States government from the legislative and executive branches, and nine private citizens, including the chairman.  Of these eighteen, twelve members, including the private citizens and the representatives from the Departments of State and Education, serve ex officio on the Commission by virtue of their appointment to CULCON, a binational advisory board to the two governments in educational and cultural affairs.  The Board’s responsibility is to manage the Trust Fund by investing it and using the proceeds to make grants to institutions in the United States and Japan to develop programs of education and exchange.

 

The JUSFC mission remains as valid now as when it was established.  The relationship between Japan and the United States is unique in sheer size, in its variety and complexity, and in its mixture of cooperation and competition, friendship and rivalry.  That relationship, however, stands on the cusp of change.

 

The regional and global environments that surround and condition the bilateral relationship are in the process of restructuring.  Globalzation has changed the terms of international trade, and this has in turn impacted the core concerns of US-Japan trade and economic relations permanently.  The consequences of this new global economic environment are still unknown.  International terrorism is even now in the process of changing the terms of global security.  This again has profound implications for US-Japan security and political relations that are only now beginning to be identified.  The new global environment has forced both nations to examine anew the fundamental character of bilateral economic, security and political ties and to reassess their optimal management.

 

The history of the past fifty years demonstrates that the United States and Japan have much in common in terms of broad national objectives.  In the short term, however, each nation has its own objectives and concerns, and identification with each other’s objectives and concerns has become more difficult in the new global environment.  Moreover, the record of the past fifty years shows that differences in thought patterns, value systems, social and economic behavior, decision-making processes and means of communication can readily lead to mutual misunderstanding and friction.  There is above all a language barrier that all too often forces each nation to react to the other through stereotypes.  There is a severe imbalance in the amount of attention that the media in the two countries devote to each other.  There is, moreover, growing recognition that many of the problems that exist and persist in the relationship are not amenable to easy solutions occasioned by enhanced cultural understanding.  We need greater knowledge of the character and causes of these problems, leading to mutual deliberation and wise policy.  Clearly, we need new ways of thinking about management of the relationship.  It is the Commission’s purpose to help make available the expertise and information necessary both for productive deliberation and effective policy.

 

The Commission today has a new sense of purpose and a more focused program of activity to meet the conditions both of its financial management and of the bilateral relationship.  It asks that the projects it supports take cognizance of the new relationship and each in its own way contribute back to the public good that Congress envisioned and sought to embody in PL 94-118.

 

Program Highlights

 

1.  Japanese Studies in the United States

 

The Commission pursues as its fundamental mandate the promotion of expertise on Japan throughout the American public.  Its primary means of accomplishing this goal is through the maintenance of the vitality of Japanese studies in institutions of American higher education and associated professional organizations.  Thus, as has been the case in previous years, Japanese studies in the United States remained the largest single category of Commission support in this period.

 

To help support basic research in the field, the Commission continued its practice in both fiscal years of making block grants to the Social Science Research Council and the Northeast Asian Council of the Association for Asian Studies.  These two organizations provide support from the Commission’s grants to individual research projects on the contemporary Japanese political economy and society, selected through peer review.  In support of Japanese language library collections and information management, the Commission continued its support of the North American Coordinating Council for Japanese Library Resources (NCC).  In support of advanced Japanese language training, the Commission continued to provide major support to the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama.  In addition, it made a second grant to the Association of Teachers of Japanese (ATJ) in FY 2001 to complete a two-year assessment of the state of advanced Japanese language training available to American university students.  Also, it continued to support the Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese in both years.  This new coordinating structure will help create a seamless transition of Japanese language study from the K-12 level into the university as its work progresses, as well as a unified Japanese language standard.  In support of this latter effort, the Commission made a grant to the University of Oregon in FY 2002 to help support the effort to create a national proficiency exam for high schools students wishing to continue their study of the Japanese language in college.

 

The close relationship between the Commission and CULCON has also led to a high degree of coordination between Commission support in Japanese studies and CULCON priorities.  In the two fiscal years under report, the most significant expressions of this close coordination were the Commission’s continued support of administration of the Bridging Project Clearinghouse inside the ATJ, continued support of the faculty and curriculum development project at the University of Pennsylvania, and in particular, in-kind support for the US-Japan Bridging Foundation, which serves to raise funds to help send more US undergraduates to study in Japan, a long-standing CULCON priority.

 

2.  The Study of the United States in Japan

 

This category, perhaps more than any other in the period under report, demonstrates the Commission’s new sense of activism in shaping programs to its own interest and specifications.  During this period the Commission continued its long-standing support of a program of exchanges between members of the American Studies Association of the United States and of the Japanese Association of American Studies, as well as between members of the Organization of American Historians and their colleagues in Japan, and the Economic History Association and their colleagues in Japan.  Through these programs, designed by the Commission itself, it aims to achieve two goals:  first, to expand opportunities for Japanese academics and graduate students to interact with colleagues from the United States and develop networks for future research and exchange; and second, to help further the process of the internationalization of American studies in the United States.

 

Senior figures in the field of the Study of the United States in Japan have continued to express their concern to the Commission that their highest priority lies in the support of graduate students entering the field in Japan, and the nurturing of a new generation to take their place as the current generation of specialists at Japanese universities begins to retire.  The Commission studied the issue in consultation with experts both in the United States and in Japan and then worked with the Graduate School for American Studies at Doshisha University in Kyoto to devise a national competition for Japanese students of American studies for funds to support of their field research in the United States.  The Commission funded a pilot program for this effort in FY 2002 and looks forward to its success, as well as similar developments in the future.

 

3.  Policy-Oriented Research

 

Since the mid-1980s, the Commission has made a concerted effort to take an active stance vis-à-vis the US-Japan relationship and the serious policy challenges facing both countries in learning to manage that relationship more effectively.  It has done this by giving support to policy research projects dealing with a broad range of topics:  economic, political and security relations with Japan, to begin with, as well as the political economy of Japan, its international relations and social policy.

 

Readers will find a wide range of subject matters covered in the Commission’s support of policy research in FY 2001 and FY 2002, as well as distribution of support across a broad range of research organizations.  Of particular interest were two two-year projects funded over the two fiscal years in this period, one on the new regional and global environment of US-Japan security and economic relations, and the other, a binational study group on ways in which the United States and Japan can cooperate in international arms control and nuclear non-proliferation.  The former grant demonstrates the Commission’s commitment to exploring the magnitude of change in the global environment that effective management of the bilateral relationship must now take into account.  The latter supports work of an advisory group to a binational commission established by the US and Japanese governments to implement more effective cooperation in the field of non-proliferation.

 

In sponsoring policy research projects the Commission intends that the results of these research efforts be pertinent to policymakers concerned with Japan in the Congress, the executive branch, various think tanks, academe and the media.  It also bases consideration of support of proposals on the degree to which the project directors can assure the Commission of a solid dissemination plan to take the results of the research to those most concerned with policies that guide US management of the bilateral relationship.  In the future, the Commission will place more emphasis on the degree of expertise on Japan and Japan-related skills and training that the organizers of potential research projects bring with them in their proposals to the Commission.

 

4.  Public Affairs/Education

 

In this category, the Commission endeavors to meet the growing demand for information on Japan throughout the United States.  It emphasizes projects that provide education and information both to selected groups of political and professional leadership, and to the American public at large.  These projects fall under two headings: Counterpart Exchanges and Media.

 

In the area of counterpart exchanges, the Commission continued to give highest priority to legislative exchange programs between the United States and Japan in FY 2001 and FY 2002.  These included the US-Japan Economic Agenda Legislative Exchange Program at The George Washington University for meetings between members of the Japanese Diet and US Congress, the United States Association of Former Members of Congress for the Congressional Study Group on Japan, and the Congressional Economic Leadership Institute for support of study tours of Japan by Members of Congress and their staff.  In the future, the Commission will seek to expand its support of counterpart exchanges to include a broad array of professional groups and interests.

 

Through its close ties to CULCON, the Commission began support of a binational effort to create a website of the history of the past fifty years of US-Japan educational and cultural exchange and interaction.  Known as Cross Currents, this site will provide a rich array of multimedia resources that document that history and offers appropriate teaching guides for students in grades 7-16.  Previewed at CULCON XX in Los Angeles in May, 2001, the first installment of the site will be unveiled at the next plenary session of CULCON in Japan in November, 2003.  In support of that work, the Commission made a grant to the University of Hawaii in FY 2002 for the development of Cross Currents.

 

In FY 2001 the Commission helped launch the Japan-US Forum at the National Bureau of Asian Research, a public on-line forum on Japan and bilateral US-Japan relations.  This pilot project proved extremely successful, and the Commission has continued its support of this effort through FY 2002 and beyond.

 

5.  The Arts

 

The Commission continues to support projects in the arts of the highest merit, in the firm belief that art is one of the most effective means of fostering better understanding between the two countries.  It recognizes that it must take an increasingly selective approach to funding in this field, given financial pressures in other program areas.  Thus beginning in FY 1999, the Commission set as its priority in the arts support for projects to send American exhibitions and performing arts to Japan.

 

Presentation of American arts and artists, especially at venues outside Tokyo, does not have a well-established history.  While the Commission worked to implement this priority directly through its own efforts in the two years under consideration, it also worked closely with the National Endowment for the Arts to design a structure under the Commission’s Infrastructure Building program that would take on the work of facilitating the presentation of American art in Japan.  Thus, in FY 2002 the Commission made a grant to Arts Midwest to establish the Cultural Trade Network, an office inside Arts Midwest devoted to this purpose.  The pilot program proved successful, and the Commission continued to support it in the next year with the expectation that it would help not only increase the flow of American performing art to Japan, but also help leverage funding from state and local sources to support the costs of such exchanges.

 

In FY 2001 and FY 2002 the Commission continued to work closely with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Japanese Agency for Cultural Affairs in sponsoring the US-Japan Creative Artists Exchange Fellowship Program.  The five Fellows spend six months in Japan, immersed in Japanese culture and its manifestations in their particular fields and training in the arts.  In addition, the Commission continued to provide support to the International House of Japan to hire an expert to facilitate the program on site. In FY 2002, the Commission provided a second grant to the International House to upgrade the program by adding a fund for resident Fellows to use for collaborative projects while they are in Japan.

 

In 2001, the Creative Artist Exchange Fellowship Program received generous support from the Freeman Foundation of Vermont through a grant to the US-Japan Bridging Foundation to support two additional artists for the 2002 Program, as well as significantly enhance facilitative services in Japan.

 

 

6.  CULCON

 

CULCON (the US-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Interchange), a bi-national advisory panel to the governments of the United States and of Japan, serves to focus official and public attention in both countries on the vital cultural and educational underpinnings of the bilateral relationship.  Its origins lie in discussions held in 1961 between President John F. Kennedy and Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda.

 

Beginning in 1978, CULCON became a program of the United States Information Agency, reverting to Department of State oversight with the consolidation of foreign affairs agencies in 1999.  In 1991, permanent secretariats were established in Tokyo and Washington to provide continuity to CULCON activities.  The US Secretariat was established inside the Commission.  Since 1991, US CULCON has become a highly visible, proactive organization, emphasizing the implementation of CULCON recommendations, frequently with the Commission’s professional and financial support.

 

In the 1990s, CULCON activity focused on two primary working groups:  undergraduate educational exchange and information access.  There also was considerable activity in media cooperation.  Breaking with precedent, CULCON held its nineteenth plenary session outside Tokyo and Washington, in Naha, Okinawa in February, 1999 and then its twentieth session in Los Angeles in 2001.  CULCON XX provided the opportunity to review the work of the Digital Culture Working Group, the current highest priority of CULCON, helping it harness the power of the Internet to its mission of improving educational and cultural relations between the two countries.

 

Support for this Working Group has been provided by the Commission in the form of the grant to University of Hawaii to develop Cross Currents, as previously described.  This and several other important CULCON initiatives have provided the impetus for much of the Commission’s new activism in shaping the projects that it supports.  The record of this new cooperation between the two entities is found in the narrative of the Commission’s grant-making activities in 2001 and 2002 above.


NOTE:  In the listings below, in many cases Commission support met only partial costs of the total project.  Readers interested in full descriptions of the following projects may refer to the Commission’s web site at www.jusfc.gov, where links are available to individual project sites, or may consult with the Commission staff.

 

Grants Awarded in Fiscal Year 2001

October 1, 2000 – September 30, 2001

Grants Awarded

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

 

A.  JAPANESE STUDIES IN THE UNITED STATES 

Faculty and Curriculum Development

    1.Japan Studies Association – for support of “Integrating Japanese Studies into the US Curriculum: A Model for ‘Stage II’ Faculty Development”

68,483

2.The University of Pennsylvania– for support of “The 2001 Faculty and Curriculum Development Seminar on Japan”

143,500

Language 

3.Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese – for support of “Staff, Infrastructure, and Project Support for the Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese”

83,000

4.Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese – for support of Year Two of  “Assessment of Advanced Japanese Language Training”
 

153,156

5.Stanford University, for the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama– for advanced Japanese language training for American graduate students

40,000,000

 




Grants Awarded

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

 

Libraries 

6.North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources – for support of “Infrastructural Support for the North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources, for Fiscal Year 2001-2002”

63,750

10,000,000

Professional Studies 

7.Columbia University, The Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture – for support of “The Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature”

 

19,617

Research 

     8.Association for Asian Studies, Inc. – for support of “NEAC/AAS Grants for Japanese Studies”

 

67,792

3,600,000

9.Social Science Research Council– for support of “Grants for Advanced Research on Japan” 

 

82,500

6,000,000

Student Exchanges 

    10.Association of Teachers of Japanese – for support of “The Bridging Project Clearinghouse to Encourage Study Abroad in Japan by American Undergraduate Students”

 

81,483

TOTAL FOR JAPANESE STUDIES IN  

THE UNITED STATES

 

$763,281

 

¥59,600,000

 

 

Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

B. THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN 

Faculty and Curriculum Development

 

 1. American Studies Association – for support of Year Three of “Japan-United States Dialogues Across the Pacific:  Globalization and American Studies”
 

4,000

1,050,000

 2. Economic Historians Association – for support of Year One of “Building Economic History Bridges between Japan and the United States”

7,870

2,061,600

 3. Organization of American Historians – for support of “JAAS/OAH Historians’ Collaborative Project”

14,938

2,507,460

TOTAL FOR THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN

 

$26,808

 

¥5,619,060

 

Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

C. POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH 
 1. The American Enterprise Institute – for support of “National Financial Reform and Restructuring in Japan and America”

30,000

 2. Economic Strategy Institute – for support of the project “A US-Japan Free Trade Agreement”

50,000

 3. The Mansfield Center for Pacific Affairs – for support of “Rural Health Care in Japan and the United States: Shared Challenges and Solutions”

56,231

 4. The Monterey Institute– for support of Year One of “US-Japan Non-Governmental Cooperation on International Arms Control and Nonproliferation” 

50,014

 5. Purdue University– for support of “The Politics of Telecommunication Regulation” and “Supporting Families, Supporting Fertility” 

41,019

 6. University of Washington – for support of Year One of “Beyond Bilateralism: US-Japanese Cooperation and Competition in Asia”

41,629

TOTAL FOR POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH

 

$268,893

¥0

 

 

Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

D. PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION 
  Outreach
1. National Association of Japan-America Societies – for support of “2020 Vision:  A Digital Road Map for Policies and Priorities in the US-Japan Relationship for the 21stCentury” 

36,812

  Counterpart Exchanges
 2. Congressional Economic Leadership Institute– for support of “2001 US-Japan Educational Exchange Program” 

80,000

 3. The George Washington University– for support of “GWU US-Japan Economic Agenda Legislative Exchange Program for 2001” 

65,827

 4. International House of Japan– for services for American educational, cultural and professional institutions in 2001 

8,500,000

 5. US Association of Former Members of Congress – for support of “Congressional Study Group on Japan”

31,533

  Media and Dissemination
6. National Association of Japan-America Societies – for support to update “On the Record”

5,000

7. National Bureau of Asian Research – for support of “Japan-US Discussion Forum”

34,273

8. New York Foundation for the Arts – for support of the documentary film Enmyoin 

25,000

9. San Diego State University– for support of “Digital Culture Resource Project” 

1,950


TOTAL FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION

$280,395

¥8,500,000

 

Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

E. THE ARTS 
 1. Exchange Fellowships for Creative Artists – jointly sponsored program funded by the JUSFC and the US National Endowment for the Arts.  The funds devoted to this program include $75,000 received from the National Endowment for the Arts.  Grant funds for the artists in FY 2001 were administered in Japan for the Commission by the International House of Japan, Inc. 

Artists sponsored under the exchange fellowships:

 

Henri Cole

Richard Hawkins

James Luna

Rahna Rizzuto

Brenda Shaughnessy

 

20,554

5,200,000

American Performances/Exhibitions in Japan 
 2. Opera Theatre of St. Louis – for support of “The Tale of Genji, An Invitation to Japan”

50,000

TOTAL FOR THE ARTS

$70,554

¥5,200,000

 

Commission Program TotalsAs of September 30, 2001

 

Japanese Studies in the United States

$ 763,281

¥  59,600,000

The Study of the United States in Japan

26,808

5,619,060

Policy-Oriented Research

268,893

0

Public Affairs/Education

280,395

8,500,000

The Arts 

70,554

5,200,000

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION PROGRAMS

$1,409,931

¥78,919,060

 

CULCON Activities Funded by Transfer from US Department of State

 

Undergraduate Educational Exchange Oversight
Committee

$  1,000

Information Access Working Group

2,200

Digital Culture Working Group

14,160

CULCON XX Plenary Session

39,850

TOTAL FOR CULCON ACTIVITIES

$57,210

 

 

Administrative Expenses of the Commission in FY 2001As of September 30, 2001

 

Personnel

$373,246

General Services Administration for Payroll,
Accounting and Other Services

43,800

Office Space

61,422

Travel

26,426

Communications

9,456

Printing, Supplies, Publications

7,415

Equipment

0

Other 

32,404

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS

$554,169

 

 
Fundraising Expenses of the Commission in FY 2001 
Travel

2,310

Communications

1,000

Consultant fee

3,500

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION FUNDRAISING COSTS

$6,810

 

 
Administrative Expenses of CULCON in FY 2001 
Personnel

$109,119

Communications

200

Supplies

200

Other

200

TOTAL FOR CULCON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS

$109,719

 


Appropriated Dollar Fund Income and Expense Statement Fiscal Year 2001 (10-1-00 through 9-30-01)

 

  INCOME 

Net Interest (Earned Basis)

$2,799,520

Refunds on Grants

50,000

Received from the National Endowment for theArts

75,000

Received from the US Department of State forCULCON support

 

166,929

  TOTAL INCOME   

$3,091,449

 

  EXPENSES 

Commission Dollar Grants

$1,409,931

Dollar Equivalent of Yen Grants

680,373

Commission Administration

554,169

Fundraising Expenses

6,810

CULCON Activities

57,210

CULCON Administration 

109,719

  TOTAL EXPENSES    

$2,818,212

 

  GAIN OR (LOSS)

$273,237

 


Appropriated Dollar Fund BalanceFiscal Year 2001 (10-1-00 through 9-30-01)

 

Original Appropriation, 1-1-76

$18,000,000

Fund Balance, 9-30-00

43,929,294

Income or (loss)

273,237

  BALANCE, 9-30-01  

$44,202,531

 

 

Gift Fund (non-appropriated)Fiscal Year 2001 (10-1-00 through 9-30-01)

 

Balance, 9-30-00

$5,613

Grants

0

Administrative ExpensesContributions

2,355

0

Refunds on Grants 

0

  BALANCE, 9-30-01  

$3,258

 

 

Bridging Project Gift Fund (non-appropriated)Fiscal Year 2001 (10-1-00 through 9-30-01)

 

Balance, 9-30-00

$7

Cash/Par

0

Contributions

0

Grants

0

Administrative Expenses

7

Interest 

0

  BALANCE, 9-30-01  

$0

 

 

 

NOTE:  In the listings below, in many cases Commission support met only partial costs of the total project.  Readers interested in full descriptions of the following projects may refer to the Commission’s web site at www.jusfc.gov, where links are available to individual project sites, or may consult with the Commission staff.

 

Grants Awarded in Fiscal Year 2002

October 1, 2001 – September 30, 2002

Grants Awarded

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

 

A.  JAPANESE STUDIES IN THE UNITED STATES 

Language

     1.Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese – for support of “Staff and Infrastructure Support for Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese”

 

86,880

2.Stanford University, for the Interuniversity Center for Japanese Language Studies in Yokohama– for advanced Japanese language training for American graduate students 

40,000,000

3.University of Oregon, Center for Applied Second Language Studies– for support of “The Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency Project” 

 

55,000

Libraries 

     4.North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources – for support of “Infrastructual Support for the North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources, for Fiscal Year 2002-2003”

 

63,750

10,000,000

 

 



Grants Awarded

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

 

Professional Studies 

     5.Columbia University, The Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture – for support of “The Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature” for FY 2002 and FY 2003.

 

40,997

Research 

     6.Association for Asian Studies, Inc. – for support of “NEAC/AAS Grants for Japanese Studies”

 

67,792

3,600,000

 7.Social Science Research Council– for support of “Grants for Advanced Research on Japan” 

 

85,000

6,000,000

 8.Social Science Research Council– for support of “Junior Scholars’ Workshop on the Embedded Enterprise in Comparative Perspective” 

 

14,414

9.University of Michigan – for support of “The Way Some Japanese Live Now” 

 

5,000

Student Exchange 

    10.Association of Teachers of Japanese – for support of “Staff and Infrastructure Support for Alliance of Associations of Teachers of Japanese”

 

77,160

TOTAL FOR JAPANESE STUDIES IN  

THE UNITED STATES

 

$495,993

 

¥59,600,000

 

 


Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

B. THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN 

Faculty and Curriculum Development

 

 1. American Studies Association– for support of Year One of “Japan-United States Dialogues Across the Pacific: New Dimensions of American Studies – ‘Technology and Society’ and ‘Citizenship and Participation’ ” 

12,020

1,050,000

 2. Economic Historians Association– for support of Year Two of “Building Economic History Bridges between Japan and the United States” 

18,375

1,586,812

 3. Organization of American Historians – for support of “JAAS/OAH Historians’ Collaborative Project” 

24,583

2,643,448

  Other 
 4. Doshisha University, Graduate School of American Studies – for support of “A Pilot Research Grant Program for MA Students in American Studies” 

2,000,000

TOTAL FOR THE STUDY OF THE UNITED STATES IN JAPAN

 

$54,978

 

¥7,280,260

 


Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

C. POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH 
 1. The Monterey Institute– for support of Year Two of “US-Japan Non-Governmental Cooperation on International Arms Control and Nonproliferation” 

50,014

 2. Pacific Forum CSIS– for support of “United States, Japan and China: Developing Stable Trilateral Ties” 

23,719

 3. Purdue University– for support of “Supporting Families, Supporting Fertility” 

10,293

 4. University of California, San Diego– for support of Year Two of “Beyond Bilateralism: US-Japanese Cooperation and Competition in Asia” 

48,644

 5. University of Hawai’i– for support of “Institutional Change in Japan:  How it Affects Economic Reform” 

37,187

TOTAL FOR POLICY-ORIENTED RESEARCH

$169,857

¥0

 


Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

D. PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION 
  Outreach  
 1. The Japanese American National Museum – for support of “From Obento to Mixed Plate: Americans of Japanese Ancestry in Multicultural Hawai’i” 

50,000

 2. National Association of Japan-America Societies – for support of “Second Annual State of the US-Japan Relationship Report” 

10,345

  Counterpart Exchanges 
 3. Congressional Economic Leadership Institute– for support of “2002 Congressional Staff Educational Exchange Program” 

85,595

 4. The George Washington University– for support of “GWU US-Japan Economic Agenda Legislative Exchange Programs” for 2001 and 2002 

198,092

1,875,000

 5. International House of Japan– for services for American educational, cultural and professional institutions in 2002 

8,500,000

 6. US Association of Former Members of Congress – for support of “The Congressional Study Group on Japan” 

31,591

 


Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

  Media and Dissemination 
7. Catticus Corporation – for support of the documentary film Sumo East and West 

2,030

8. National Bureau of Asian Research– for support of “Japan-US Discussion Forum” 

25,910

9. New York Foundation for the Arts – for support of the documentary film Enmyoin 

25,000

10. University of Hawaii – for support of “Cross-Currents– Phase I” 

23,000

TOTAL FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS/EDUCATION

$451,563

¥10,375,000

 

 

 

Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

E. THE ARTS 
 1. Exchange Fellowships for Creative Artists– jointly sponsored program funded by the JUSFC and the US National Endowment for the Arts.  The funds devoted to this program include $75,000 received from the National Endowment for the Arts.  Grant funds for the artists in FY 2002 were administered in Japan for the Commission by the International House of Japan, Inc.  Yen funds for FY 2002 include funds for collaborative projects carried out in Japan by the Creative Artist Fellows. 

Additional funds were provided by the Freeman Foundation to the US-Japan Bridging Foundation to allow the 2002 Program to expand to seven fellows and to enhance facilitative services in Japan.

 

Artists sponsored under the exchange fellowships:

 

Sayed Alavi

Kenneth Fries

Elizabeth Mead

Nandlal Nayak

Robert Pyzocha

Lisa Vice

Perry Yung

 

23,973

23,635,436


Grants Awarded

 

US Dollar Grants

Japanese Yen Grants

American Performances/Exhibitions in Japan 
 2. Goh Productions – for support of “Reverse Psychology: Japan” 

30,000

 3. Triton Arts Network– for support of “Good Old Days: from the American Renaissance to the Jazz Age” 

1,090,000

Other 
 4. Arts Midwest– for support of “United States Cultural Trade Network” 

 

65,425

TOTAL FOR THE ARTS

$119,398

¥24,725,436


 

 

Commission Program TotalsAs of September 30, 2002

 

Japanese Studies in the United States

$495,993

¥59,600,000

The Study of the United States in Japan

54,978

7,280,260

Policy-Oriented Research

169,857

0

Public Affairs/Education

451,563

10,375,000

The Arts 

119,398

24,725,436

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION PROGRAMS

$1,291,789

¥101,980,696

 

CULCON Activities Funded by Transfer from US Department of State

Cross Currents

$20,000

Digital Culture Working Group

17,400

Information Access Working Group

500

Undergraduate Exchange Oversight Committee 

1,000

TOTAL FOR CULCON ACTIVITIES

$38,900

 

 


 

 

Administrative Expenses of the Commission in FY 2002As of September 30, 2002

 

Personnel

$374,000

General Services Administration for Payroll,Accounting and Other Services

44,000

Office Space

72,000

Travel

27,600

Communications

14,280

Printing, Supplies, Publications

3,000

Equipment

320

Other 

45,400

TOTAL FOR COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS

$580,600

 

 

 

Administrative Expenses of CULCON in FY 2002 
Personnel

$112,421

Communications

200

Supplies

200

Other 

200

TOTAL FOR CULCON ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS

$113,021

 

 

 

 

Appropriated Dollar Fund Income and Expense Statement Fiscal Year 2002 (10-1-01 through 9-30-02)

 

  INCOME 
Net Interest (Earned Basis)

$2,731,455

Refunds on Grants

46,057

Received from the US National Endowment for the Arts

75,000

Received from US Department of State for CULCON support 

151,921

  TOTAL INCOME   

$3,004,433

 

  EXPENSES 
Commission Dollar Grants

$1,291,789

Dollar Equivalent of Yen Grants

793,624

Commission Administration

580,600

CULCON Activities

38,900

CULCON Administration 

113,021

  TOTAL EXPENSES   

$2,817,934

 

  GAIN OR (LOSS)  

$186,499

 

 

 

Appropriated Dollar Fund BalanceFiscal Year 2002 (10-1-01 through 9-30-02)

 

Original Appropriation, 1-1-76

$18,000,000

Fund Balance, 9-30-01

44,202,531

Income or (loss) 

186,499

  BALANCE, 9-30-02  

$44,389,030

 

 

Gift Fund (non-appropriated)Fiscal Year 2002 (10-1-01 through 9-30-02)

 

Balance, 9-30-01

$3,258

Grants

0

Administrative Expenses

2,398

Contributions

3,159

Refunds on Grants 

0

  BALANCE, 9-30-02  

$4,019